Play at Home: Sensory Treasure Boxes

Sensory Treasure Boxes

I knew that having kids would unleash the arts and crafts lover inside me. Pasta shapes, glitter glue, pipe cleaners, PVA – I love all that stuff. Give me some yarn to make a pompom and I’m in heaven. I told you all this sensory stuff was as much for my benefit as the twins’ a couple of weeks ago and I really meant it.

So, while I got out and about to classes pretty early after the babies were born (so important in keeping me sane!), I missed a spot at the local Baby Sensory class because it’s always in such high demand and of course we needed two spaces. The course was on my hit list during pregnancy thanks to my sister’s recommendation but our local area is mummy central so you gotta be quick off the mark. We did eventually start in July, so all was not lost, but in the meantime I wanted to do a bit of sensory stuff at home with the girls to get them started. I put these boxes together at 8 weeks, having seen some similar ones on Pinterest and having read all about the benefits in the only parenting book I bothered with – The Gentle Parenting Book: How to raise calmer, happier children from birth to seven by Sarah Ockwell-Smith. 

Sensory Treasure Boxes

Treasure Boxes (often called baskets) are just simple containers filled lots of objects for little ones to feel and explore. Apparently a treasure box with some natural bits in is best, because while bright, clashing colours and manmade textures are stimulating, studies say that babies and small children actually respond better to and learn more from natural materials and muted colours. From my research, I concluded that mix of everyday objects and a few things a little out of the ordinary should do the trick nicely. 

In simple terms, kids learn through their senses, so treasure boxes provide a wonderland of things to look at, feel, smell, listen to and taste. The stimulation they get from what they play with helps them make connections in their brain and gives them an opportunity to learn and remember, applying what they’ve learnt to their experiences going forward. Studies say that watching a baby play with a treasure box gives us an insight into how their physical, cognitive, emotional and communication skills are developing. Putting items in twos and threes is also proven to help develop numeracy skills. It’s advised that as adults we leave them to it, so when the girls and I get these out, I just offer help when it’s needed – that way they can learn to rely on their instincts instead of being spoonfed.

Nina’s Box:

– a handful of coloured feathers
– a small measuring spoon
– a cork
– half a sponge
– a pompom
– a wooden dinosaur
– pasta shapes
– a foam “N”
– two pipe cleaners – one glittery, one plain
– a pebble from the beach where Grandma & Gramps live
– a string of pompoms
– an interesting ribbon from a gift

Sensory Treasure Boxes

Ada’s Box:

– a handful of coloured feathers
– a measuring spoon
– a cork
– half a sponge
– a pompom
– a wooden dinosaur
– pasta shapes
– a foam “A”
– two pipe cleaners – one glittery, one plain
– a shell from the beach Grandma & Gramps live
– a string of pompoms
– an interesting ribbon from a gift

Our boxes are Wham Boxes from Staples (£5.29 for 4) and the initial letter stickers for the box lids were found by the checkout in Topshop!

For me, it was important that the boxes I made for Nina and Ada were slightly different. We try never to match the girls, as we’re keen to help them develop their own personalities and independence as they get older (especially now most school separate twins into different classes from Reception). Where possible I always pick different colours for them, and if possible a different design (like with the dinos). When the twins play with these together they interact with each other and borrow items from each other’s boxes too – double the fun. It’s great to watch them discovering each other as well as the stuff in the boxes!

Sensory Treasure Boxes

Examples of other stuff you could add to your box:

– pine cones
– conkers
– cloth or fabric scraps
– leaves
– fruit
– keys
– bells or shakers
– hair rollers
– scrunchies
– comb
– toothbrush
– rubber duck

and loads more… get creative! I find it’s best to get these out when the girls are fed and rested, to maximise the time they spend playing. Obviously some of the bits are small so they should never play with these unsupervised either. If you get boxes which fasten tightly, they’re great to travel with too and can provide up to about an hour of quiet time when you’re out and about.

What do think? Fancy giving it a go? Let me know how you get on in the comments or over on Twitter @whipuntilfluffy. Happy playing!

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