Poultry

Yorkshire Day with Le Creuset: Spanish Spiced Chicken with Yorkshire Salami

Yorkshire Day Spanish Spiced Chicken

Hello again! Today I’m back with the main course from my Yorkshire Day menu, served up for my cookery demonstration at the Le Creuset store in the Victoria Quarter. For the starter recipe, check out Monday’s post: Courgette Risotto.

The thinking behind this dish, is that I wanted to again show the versatility of my Le Creuset 30cm casserole dish. I’ve spoken so much about this dish since I bought it, and it really is such a useful item to have in your kitchen. It’ll go from the hob, into the oven and, from there, straight to the table. And it’s roomy enough to cook for a whole family. One pot chicken dishes are two a penny in our house, they’re an easy tea option for either a weeknight, or to feed friends. The same basic recipe can be adapted with loads of different spices and extras to keep things different. In February, I made a similar thing with One Pot Spiced Chicken with Smashed Squash, Sweet Potato and Charred Cauliflower.

Yorkshire Day Spanish Spiced Chicken Yorkshire Day Spanish Spiced Chicken

This time, as I was cooking on show and I had a limited timescale, I chose the simple spice combination of cumin seeds and paprika. These spices lend themselves well to a slow, warming heat but nothing too eye-watering. They give the dish character without blowing anyone’ s head off. This type of dish will pretty much take as many ingredients as you fancy. You can pack it with all different types of veg and carbs. It works well with jerk seasoning, or cajun spices, rice and black eyed peas – Caribbean style, or with sausage, cider and butter beans for something more mild.

The local element of this dish (although I bought the veg locally also), is the salami. It turns out Yorkshire is somewhat of a hotspot for cured meats. While you can get official Yorkshire Chorizo, made on Church End Farm in Skipton, which I’ve used before, I went for a salami cured at The Reliance – a pub on the outskirts of Leeds town centre which I mentioned in my Where to Eat in Leeds post. Dried and cured on site, they offer two flavours: Fennel and Chilli & Black Pepper. I referred to this as chorizo throughout my demonstration, which it isn’t (whoops), but the salami works in very much the same way – with the same texture, just less spice. Salami lets out oil, much in the same way as chorizo does, but a little less, and with a much meatier flavour. If I were making this dish with supermarket ingredients, I’d use chorizo and use slightly less paprika in my spice mix, as supermarket chorizo contains more fat and therefore lets out much more spiced oil.

Yorkshire Day Spanish Spiced Chicken Yorkshire Day Spanish Spiced Chicken

The biggest thing to be aware of when you’re cooking this dish is texture. Each element needs a bit of special treatment to keep the textures as they should be. For the chicken, crispy skin is a must. For the salami, the outside needs caramelising to save things getting too chewy. Potatoes must be cooked through and the green beans must be crunchy. That’s why, the browning process, though it seems time consuming, is important. Be patient, it doesn’t add much time on and the dish will taste so much better.

Spanish Spiced Chicken with Yorkshire Salami (makes enough for 4 sharing)

5 Shallots or 1 Large/2 Small Onions
2 Garlic Cloves
2 Sprigs of Thyme
2 tbsp Smoked Paprika
2 tbsp Cumin Seeds, crushed
1 tsp Salt
1 tsp Black Pepper
1 tsp Olive Oil
2 tbsp White Wine Vinegar
1 Whole Chicken, jointed or 4 thighs & 4 legs skin-on
300g Salami or Chorizo
2 Large Handfuls of Jersey Royal Potatoes
250g Trimmed Green Beans
500g Chicken Stock

1. Chop the salami into chunks and put it into a dry pan. Place on a medium heat and leave for five minutes, flipping the pieces over once to get a nice caramelisation on each side. Remove from the pan and set aside.

2. Add your chicken pieces, skin side down into the pan with the oil from the salami. Again, leave for five minutes to brown. Only the skin side needs to be browned. Don’t worry about the chicken being pink on the inside, we’re just colouring it, not cooking it through. When the skin turns a golden brown, remove the chicken from the pan and set aside.

3. For this kind of dish, I like to chop my onions a little chunkier than usual. Thicker onion slices will add another texture element to the dish. Chop or slice your onions roughly and place them in the pan (now complete with salami and chicken juices) on a low heat. Sweat them down for five minutes until they are just starting to soften and add finely chopped garlic and thyme leaves. Cook for another five minutes.

4. In a small bowl, mix the paprika, cumin seeds (crush or finely chop these before), salt and pepper together and add your olive oil. Mix to turn it into a paste. Transfer this paste to the pan and combine with onions. When the spices are mixed in and the onions are simmering, pour in the white wine vinegar. This bit of liquid serves to deglaze the pan. Scrape your spatula along the bottom to make sure you catch all those delicious brown parts, adding flavour to what will become the sauce and reducing it down into a concentrated liquor. You can do this with booze too, a glass of white wine would do, or staying with the Spanish theme, a sherry. At a push, you can use a little splash of stock to do this.

5. When most of the liquid has disappeared, slice your new potatoes lengthways and place them flesh side down into your pan, making sure they make contact with the bottom. Direct contact with the surface of the pan will build up a bit of a crust, and cutting the potatoes lengthways means they’ll cook through quicker – meaning there’s no need to par-boil them.

6. Begin to layer up the browned salami and then the chicken on top of that, making sure the skin is facing up. Pour stock into the pan so it covers the potatoes. Stop there, as any liquid covering the chicken will prevent it from browning and going crispy in the heat of the oven. Let it simmer on the hob for five minutes.

7. Place into a oven preheated to 180ºc on the middle shelf. Place the lid on but slightly cocked, to let a little bit of steam out. Prep your beans and after 30 minutes, remove the lid and scatter the beans over. Cook for a further 25-30 minutes and transfer straight to the table. Serve out of the pan, family style.

With this type of recipe, you don’t need to worry too much about over or under cooking the chicken. After around 40 mins the chicken will be moist and perfectly cooked through. A little extra time won’t make the meat lose its tenderness because of the liquid in the pot. Don’t be scared, it’ll be delicious – in life, there are plenty of things to be precise about, but this dish isn’t one of them!

Yorkshire Day Spanish Spiced Chicken Yorkshire Day Spanish Spiced Chicken

Because the only pan and dish needed for this recipe is the 30cm casserole, I’m going to use this opportunity to talk about some of the other Le Creuset items I used during my cooking demo – things you wouldn’t necessarily think of when it comes to Le Creuset. First up, the Cool Tools. I have a few of these in my kitchen and I can’t tell you how useful they are. They’re pretty straight forward really, a heat proof mat that will protect your work surfaces and dining table even if your pot comes straight from a scorching oven. They’re reliable, they look goo and they don’t retain heat, so you won’t burn yourself. The Round Cool Tool is just £7 and the perfect companion for the 30cm Casserole, plus you can coordinate them with your cookware!

Next up, the Chef’s Apron (£30) and Double Oven Gloves (£19). Now, I know that these aren’t the kind of things that normally make you excited to spend your money, but make an investment in them and they’ll become a solid part of your kitchen kit. Thick, reliable and good quality, spending the extra cash beats buying multiples in the supermarket and burning your hands when they start to wear out. I don’t own either of these yet, but I plan on buying both soon. The apron is comfortable to wear, despite it’s thick material, the double waistbands are flattering and there are four (FOUR!) pockets, for you know, storing stuff. Available in Cerise, Cassis, Cream, Black, Coastal Blue and Nutmeg.

Yorkshire Day Spanish Spiced Chicken

On Friday, I’m back with the final course of my Yorkshire Day menu. It’s a staple recipe you can adapt to suit your needs, perfect for summer, with little unusual extra too: Yorkshire Tea Ice Cream with Rhubarb Pickle. See you soon!

Disclaimer: I’m working as Le Creuset Leeds’ blogger ambassador. As laid out in this post, I adore the brand and have plunged much of my hard earned cash into building my collection, long before Whip Until Fluffy was even a twinkle in my eye. In exchange for cooking for some bloggers on Yorkshire Day, the brand offered me a handsome discount on future purchases (and a fantastic experience!) – but no gifts or payments were exchanged for this, or any other, post.

What to Eat in February

What to Eat in February

Vegetables: brussels sprouts, cauliflower, celeriac, chicory, jerusalem artichoke, kale, kohlrabi, leeks, parsnips, potatoes, shallots, squash, swede, sweet potatoes, truffles (black), turnips.

Fruit: blood oranges, clementines, kiwi fruit, lemons, oranges, passion fruit, pineapple, pomegranate, rhubarb.

Meat & Fish: guinea fowl, partridge, turkey, venison, clams, lemon sole, lobster, mackerel, mussels, oysters.

As I write this, there’s a storm out. When I look up, the grey is clearing, making room for bright blue skies with candy floss clouds, but I still hear the rain sploshing on the windows and the doors banging in the draft. It occurs to me that this kind of sums February up, the last month of Winter. Times are a-changin’, but probably only in small increments for another 28 days, when dull and biting February will buckle to bright and breezy March and spring’s first days allow us to shake off our winter coats and leave them in the cupboard. January may have been bitter, but it’s ok, hope is on the horizon.

For me, February is all about roots. It’s our last chance to make the most of those knobbly, earthy gems before Spring brings greens and we’re all gushing about asparagus and pea pods, before anyone who’s anyone is leaving those muddy, scraggy guys to rest in favour of their prettier relatives. I’ve got a lot of love for those roots, so in February I like to make use of what’s left, think parsnips, turnips, jerusalem artichokes. And of course, that nubby diamond in the rough, celeriac.

For this month’s recipe, I went with what was in stock. Sweet potatoes and a butternut squash, jewel-like against a browned spiced chicken, rubbed in moroccan flavours, topped with charred cauliflower. All in one pot, softening in each other’s juices, speared with fresh rosemary. Killer one pot chicken dishes are usually my husband’s forte. Caribbean, French, North African flavours, he’s mastered them all. This is the stuff winter is made of, for us. Marinated and cooking in it’s own fat, alongside a smidge of lard and a bit of stock, all dryness is banished from the bird and the flesh comes away from the bone like butter. A one pot is easy to put together, saves on washing up and looks as impressive as a roast with a tenth of the effort. Perfect for a lazy February afternoon, when all you really want to do is snuggle under a blanket with your book. Add a tumbler of wine and you’re in for a warming, seasonal treat. Probably a mid-afternoon snooze, too.

What to Eat in February

One Pot Spiced Chicken with Smashed Squash, Sweet Potato and Charred Cauliflower (enough for two)

1 Small Chicken
1 Butternut Squash
2 Medium Sweet Potatoes
Half a Head of Cauliflower
Half a Lemon
Fresh Rosemary to Garnish
30g Lard
Oil for Cooking

For the rub:
2 Tbsp Cumin Seeds
1 Tbsp Smoked Paprika
2 Tsp Caraway Seeds
2 Tsp Dried Chilli Flakes
2 Tsp Cinnamon
2 Tsp Cayenne Pepper
1 Tsp Nutmeg
1 Tsp Salt
1 Tbsp Fresh Rosemary
1 Tbsp Olive Oil

What to Eat in February

If I’m making a one pot chicken dish, I generally find it cheaper to buy a whole chicken and joint it myself. I’m planning to do a post showing you how I do that, but for now, put your trust in Delia. She starts her instructions with “this is nothing to be afraid of” and I wholeheartedly concur. Save your chicken wings and freeze them alongside the carcass, which you should roast off in a hot oven and keep to make stock out of when you have two or three saved up. Whole chickens are very economic, especially if you can save cash with a multi-buy, joint them and freeze the individual pieces for later. You can always buy your chicken ready jointed at the supermarket, no judgement here, and obviously I don’t need to lecture you on the benefits of bone-in, skin-on thighs and legs vs breast fillets, right? Right.

Once you have your chicken pieces, measure out your spices. Here, I find it easiest to use an electric spice grinder, but a pestle and mortar is a good work out and will make you feel like you earned your supper. Alternatively, use the end of a rolling pin on your chopping board, just make do with what you have. When you have a fine mix, add in your oil and mix, you should end up with a thickish, red paste, still relatively dry. Roll your chicken around in it, rub it into all the crevasses. Set aside for later.

What to Eat in February

Preheat your oven to 180ºC. Put a large saucepan full of salted water on to boil. In the meantime, peel and cube your squash. Those buggers can be tough, but don’t let them win. This video from The Shiska in the Kitchen should help, if you need. Next, do the same with your sweet potato. When the water comes to the boil, dunk your veg in and turn down to a simmer. Find yourself an overproof dish big enough to hold all your ingredients. I went with a Le Creuset Shallow Casserole (love of my life) which is 26cm across. Pop in a glug or two of oil, veg or olive, and heat. When the dish is good and hot, place the chicken in. Leave it in there, sizzling, while you drain your vegetables. They should’ve been cooking for around 5 minutes at this point. Cover and set them aside. Brown your chicken in the dish for around 4 minutes on each side. Turn off the hob.

Place your knob of lard into the dish with the chicken. Transfer your root veg into the dish and arrange it around the meat. Scatter over  some fresh rosemary. Chop your cauliflower into little florets and arrange it around the outside edge. Season with salt and pepper, squeeze over the juice of half a lemon and cover. Place inside the oven on the middle shelf. Cook for 30 minutes. When your timer beeps, reach in and remove the lid. Mix things around a bit. If you’re worried things are getting too dry (each bird will release a different amount of fat, after all) you can simply add a cupful of chicken stock. Cook for a further 30 minutes or until the edges of the veg are turning a deep brown. If you’re worried about the chicken, just stick a fork in and if the juices run clear, you’re all good. To serve, mash any large chucks of squash or potato roughly with a fork and sprinkle with more fresh rosemary.

What to Eat in February

Take the dish to the table and tuck in. It’s a fairly filling meal for two, but if you want to flesh it out, add some buttered rolls as a side and you might end up with some chicken leftover for lunch in the week. The spice and richness of this meal pairs well with a red wine, as you may find that a white is delicate for the robust flavours. Personally, I wouldn’t call this a really spicy dish. It doesn’t blow your head off but leaves more of a background warmth instead. If you did want something cooling to cut through it though, a blob of sour cream with a little lemon juice mixed through would do nicely.

Other dishes to eat in February:

Farfalle, Pancetta & Kale from Food&_
Roasted Winter Citrus from Joy the Baker
Celery Root and Cauliflower Puree with Garlic Greens from Gourmande in the Kitchen
Warm Brussel Sprout Salad from A Beautiful Mess
Jerusalem Artichoke and Cheese Gratin from Lavender and Lovage
Butternut Squash and Swiss Chard Ravioli from Eva Kolenko
Pomegranate, Pear & Kale Salad from Chasing Raspberries

Tell me, what are you eating this month?